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Wire for 24 Volt Pump

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  • Wire for 24 Volt Pump

    So, I have this transfer pump:

    http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/2RB99

    And bought 2 of these 12v outlet plugs to install in the bed of my truck so I don't have to take a separate battery with me when transferring oil (don't know why I got two, just did):

    http://www.jcwhitney.com/autoparts/P...t=power+outlet

    Anyway, since this pump is rated for 24 volts, is there any way to actually run the pump off the truck at 24 volts and not 12v in order to pump a little faster? I'm no electrician so excuse my ignorance. Would I be able to do this by installing both of these outlets side by side (one to each battery) and making a custom plug that plugs into each of these at same time and then connect to battery? Similar to this adapter but switching the male/female ends:

    http://www.jcwhitney.com/autoparts/P...t=power+outlet

    Any help or better alternatives would be greatly appreciated.
    2000 7.3 F-250 w/ V3

  • #2
    I was just thinking about this the other day. I'd like to pump the oil out of my tank and back into a barrel for re-filtering before I go through anymore Donaldsons. My barrel pump is fine, as long as the oil is coming from a barrel, and not vice versa.

    My thought was you're not going to be able to pull anymore than ~14 volts from the truck because that is the most your alternator should be dishing out at any given time. If you can add the 2, that'd be great, and I think I'd be buying this pump, or one like it.
    Vegistrokin since 08/23/08

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    • #3
      OK, if connected the way I mentioned above would put them in parallel and would keep the voltage the same and only increase the amps. To put in series, what about routing like this:



      Is there any danger in connecting the batteries this way? Would this work?
      2000 7.3 F-250 w/ V3

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      • #4
        No danger to the batts, but you'll have to isolate the 24v from all of your 12v components in truck. I'll have to think about that some more...
        2001 F350 XLT 4x4, dually flatbed. 6637 air filter, single-shot injectors, straight-piped, BTS tunes, 200 gal main VO tank - 180k greasy miles
        2000 Excursion Limited 4x4. V3, AIS intake, BTS trans & tunes - 120k VO miles
        veggiegarage.com authorized installer

        RIP X & Toyhauler - you served us well.

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        • #5
          High voltage

          All the commerical trucks i used to drive were 24 volts.Study these rigs wiring same as schematic shown.They have a series of switchs that control which batteries are being used.Usually there are 4 batterys,but only two are being used(most appliciations).If you could 1) use a switch to seperate from truck electrical,2)separate switch to put in series. that would take care of everything except recharging second battery.I would keep that battery isolated with its own separtely grounded lines.You could tie in at alternator(i would suggest high amp "Audio Industry" like for High wattage stereos in autos.these batterys could be discharged then swith to next set,this is the best isolation i can think of,with out risking truck short-circuts.Good luck:cheers:
          2000 7.3X V3 So much fun,so little time,Support small Oil,burn WVO,Free and greasy down the road I go!!!!!!!!!!completely self sufficient and proud of it. (Wood furnace.....X.......solar pontoon....solarsheat twins this summer.....I don't Know much.......I'm just a hillbilly with too many guns..............

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